Save Al-Qaeda by Sparing Civilians in Yemen? Or Destroy Al-Qaeda at All Costs so Civilians are Free?

Osama Bin Laden, founder of terror group Al Qaeda, sits contentedly with his machine gun.

Senators more concerned about civilians than Al-Qaeda’s ownership of Yemen are trying to rein in Saudi Arabia’s support for the battle against terrorism there.

The effort is intended to stagnate the successful fight ongoing against Al-Qaeda using Yemen and owning it as a lawless and governmentless territory to train terrorists for worldwide jihad.

Al-Qaeda has been largely responsible for thousands of civilian deaths and the chaos in Yemen, which has ceased to be a nation.

This conundrum reveals the difficulties of waging a war against terrorism that wipes out the enemy at the expense of civilian deaths.

Yemen in this respect is the ultimate test of political correctness versus a dedicated military intervention aimed at restoring law, order, justice and government in what has become a lawless jihadist state where anything goes.

An influential bipartisan duo of lawmakers is using this week’s consideration of a must-pass defense spending bill to try to help millions of people in Yemen, where a Saudi-led, U.S.-backed coalition has killed thousands of civilians in a conflict that has created desperate new health and starvation crises.

Sens. Todd Young (R-Ind.) and Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) are rallying support for an amendment to the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act that would condition U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia on American officials guaranteeing that Riyadh is following international humanitarian law, particularly on permitting the delivery of American-bought cranes to unload ships filled with food at a major Yemeni port, it was reported on the Huffington Post website.

The legislation is an uphill battle supposedly, and with good reason.

This is an instance when the power of right conflicts with political correctness. When the needs of civilians are relegated to the harsh realities of a torturous battlefield where the stakes are so high, armies should be made to stop their wars against the enemies of the civilians to save them.

There is a magnificent moment in the movie Saving Private Ryan when American troops have fought their way into a Nazi controlled small French village with civilians and old churches and buildings from the 15th Century.

A British tank commander is viewing the ancient town when the Americans notice a Nazi tank behind a row of bushes turning its turret and readying a volley at the Brits.

“There is a Nazi tank behind those bushes,” Tom Hanks let’s the tank commander know.

He doesn’t see the Nazi tank, however.

“If I shoot at those bushes it could cause damage to the old buildings. Collateral damage,” he more or less says to Hanks.

As he finishes the last word, the Nazi tank unloads a salvo that blows up the British tank and sends the commander and his troops to heaven.

Such metaphor is the stuff for movies — and the very same thing is happening everyday in Yemen where the effort to destroy and erase Al-Qaeda as a force is something American politicians are now banding together to stop.

We have to ask why?

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